IUSSI logo
IUSSI North-west European section

International Union for the Study of Social Insects

who's where vacancies INSECTSmail

Vacancies

Here you will find details of social insect related job vacancies, studentships and grants currently available. If you have any social insect related vacancies that you would like to have advertised here, please e-mail to INSECTS@bio.ku.dk. All advertisements must include either a closing date for applications, or a date on which they may be removed from the web site. This page was last modified on Tuesday, January 4, 2022


Overview of vacancies on this page:

PhD: Nutrigenomics and the resilience of bees in a changing climate, Hull

Postdoc: The genomic basis of social niche construction during colony founding, Münster, Germany

PhD: Imprinting and Ploidy in Bumblebees, Leicester

Postdoc: Ant Population Genomics, Social Supergene Evolution, University of Lausanne

2 PhD Positions, Ant Population Genomics & Social Supergene Drive, University of Lausanne

PhD position: Bee social behavior and life history evolution, Utah State University

2 postdoc positions: Behavioural Genomics and Molecular Ecology, York University, Canada

PhD opportunities: Institute of Science and Technology Austria

PhD: Role of gene regulation in the social control of queen behavioral specialization in ants, Mainz

Join the PhD Programme „Gene Regulation in Evolution“ (GenEvo) in Mainz, Germany

Postdoc: Evolution of mimetic colour patterns in bumblebees, Pennsylvania State University

Post-doc: Honey Bee Genomics and Molecular Neuroscience, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

PhD: Floral preferences of bumblebees across a range of European climates, Durham

PhD project on Bee Behavior & Ecology, Bristol

PhD: Ants as ecosystem engineers: using ants to promote biodiversity, University of York, UK

Post-doc: Juvenile Hormone and the Evolution of Bee Eusociality, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

PhD: Carpenter Ants and Their Endosymbionts, Texas Tech University

Post-doc: Genetic Conflict in Social Systems, Georgia Institute of Technology

Post-doc: Bumblebee Mimetic Color Variation, Penn State University

Post-doc: Bee Genomics, Penn State


PhD: Nutrigenomics and the resilience of bees in a changing climate, Hull

Deadline for applications: 5 Jan 2022

To apply, and for more details: https://panorama-dtp.ac.uk/research/nutrigenomics-and-the-resilience-of-bees-in-a-changing-climate/
For details please contact Dr James Gilbert (james.gilbert@hull.ac.uk).
Eligibility: UK, EU and International: see further info here: https://panorama-dtp.ac.uk/how-to-apply/
Funding: UK (NERC, Competition-funded; CASE partner)

A fully funded PhD position is now open for applications at the Universities of Hull and Leeds, UK, via NERC's Panorama Doctoral Tranining Partnership programme.

Bees, our foremost pollinators, are vital for ecosystem stability and global food security – providing pollination services worth hundreds of billions of pounds annually. The UK is home to ~245 species of wild bees which collectively perform more pollination than managed honeybees and bumblebees. Unfortunately, wild bee populations are declining, under pressure from multiple causes – one key factor being nutrition.

All bees feed offspring with pollen gathered from the landscape. But human influences such as agricultural intensification are altering nutritional landscapes for bees [3,4], and fundamentally affecting gene expression, growth and reproduction. Most of what we know about bee nutrition comes from studies in social bees like honeybees or bumblebees [5,6], where nutrition influences caste determination, development, pathogen resistance and others. However, the nutritional ecology of other bees, particularly solitary bees, is largely unstudied.

Human activity is also changing climates and raising average temperatures. Temperature affects animals' metabolic rate, physiology, digestion, and nutrient assimilation, as well as gene expression. Dr Gilbert's recent work [7] has identified the need to store enough carbohydrate and fat to survive the winter as potentially critical for solitary bees' nutritional ecology. But we know little about how this is regulated, how climate change will affect bees, and how bees will deal with changing nutritional landscapes in a future filled with uncertainty.

We are now, for the first time, in a position to understand not just whether but also how different nutritional landscapes and climates affect bees. This exciting cross-institutional project combines field ecology with cutting edge molecular approaches to address a crucial knowledge gap about how bees are being affected by human-altered nutritional landscapes. This project addresses issues relevant for pure ecological science, conservation biology, agriculture and crop science.

At Hull, Dr Gilbert's lab has pioneered rearing protocols for the economically and ecologically important solitary bee, Osmia bicornis. This work is providing an unprecedented window onto bee nutritional ecology. At Leeds, Dr Duncan's lab uses a variety of cutting-edge molecular tools to understand how bees are influenced by their environment. Dr Duncan has conducted groundbreaking work on how nutrition affects gene expression in developing bees, as well as recent work on the environmental and molecular control of reproduction in O. bicornis. The student will capitalise on this timely opportunity to synthesize the research interests of these two research groups and create collaborative links between institutions. The candidate will be integrated into both lab groups and will benefit from the infrastructure and connections at both universities.

Using careful manipulations within controlled laboratory environments, the student will first establish how dietary macronutrients affect the fitness of solitary bee larvae in response to changes in rearing temperature. Then, they will use high-throughput sequencing technology to examine genome-wide expression profiles of larvae receiving different diet and temperature treatments, to understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying bees' responses to landscape and climate change. Nutritional cues are known to alter gene expression [8], but to date studies have focussed largely on a few genes, and only in honeybees. The student will compare larvae receiving different treatments in (1) choices larvae make about which nutrients to consume, (2) correlates of fitness such as body size and overwinter survival, and (3) expression of growth- versus diapause-related genes.

Outcomes: The findings will, firstly, shed light on the optimal nutrition for bees – both currently, and in a warmer future. They will help inform active measures such as wildflower strips to conserve and promote these vital pollinators as the climate changes. Secondly, results will also show the physiological effects of different nutritional landscapes upon bees, now and in the future, allowing us a detailed understanding of the resilience of solitary bees to landscape change in a changing climate. Finally, the results will provide comparisons and contrasts with existing knowledge of social bee gene expression, physiology and nutrigenomics, providing unparalleled insights into bee nutritional ecology.

References:
1. Coley P, et al. Oecologia. 2002;133: 62–69.
2. Rothman JM, et al. Ecology. 2015;96: 873–878.
3. Naug D. Biol Conserv. 2009;142: 2369–2372.
4. Donkersley P, et al. Ecol Evol. 2014;4: 4195–4206.
5. Paoli PP, et al. Amino Acids. 2014;46: 1449–1458.
6. Helm BR, et al. Biol Open. 2017;6: 872–880.
7. Austin AJ, Gilbert JDJ. Funct. Ecol. 2021;35(5):1069-80.
8. Di Pasquale G, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8: e72016.

Posted 4/1/2022


Postdoc: The genomic basis of social niche construction during colony founding, Münster, Germany

Deadline for applications: 6 January 2022

The Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity at the University of Münster, Germany, is seeking to fill the position of a Postdoctoral Research Associate (Wissenschaftliche/r Mitarbeiter/in - salary level TV-L E 13, 100%) from the earliest possible date. The position is within the externally funded project SFB/TRR 212. We are offering a fixed-term full-time position until 31 December 2025 corresponding to the duration of the project.

Your tasks:
The position is part of the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR 212) entitled "A Novel Synthesis of Individualisation across Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution: Niche Choice, Niche Conformance, Niche Construction" (NC3: https://www.unibielefeld. de/fakultaeten/biologie/forschung/verbuende/sfb_nc3/3) and funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

The project focuses on the genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic basis of social niche construction during colony founding. Individual Pogonomyrmex californicus ant queens can choose to start a new colony alone (haplometrosis) or they can join or accept other co-founding queens (pleometrosis). During the first two weeks of colony founding, co-founding queens interact in multiple ways and so construct their individualized social niche. They either accept additional queens or they evict/kill them. Matched interactions, where pleometrotic queens interact with each other, lead to a fitness gain whereas mismatched interactions, where haplometrotic and pleometrotic queens interact, lead to a fitness loss (for one or both). The frequency of these alternative founding strategies varies within and among subpopulations. The first funding period revealed the genomic and genetic architecture of this social niche polymorphism. In the second funding period, we will focus on three aims.

  1. Confirming and experimentally testing candidate genes and epigenetic mechanisms (histone modification and DNA methylation), that we identified in the first funding period.
  2. Develop a generalized evolutionary framework/model that takes into account the relation between genotype, phenotype, individualized social niche and fitness.
  3. Understand why colony founding above a certain number of cofounding pleometrotic queens will always fail. Is this a constraint (division of labour) or an adaptation (spitefulness) in the context of the evolution of pleometrosis.

The successful candidate will conduct behavioural field and laboratory studies in cooperation with Prof Jennifer Fewell (Arizona State University) in Arizona and California. The secondary emphasis will be on transcriptomic, genomic and epigenetic studies using a variety of methods (dsRNAi, ATACseq, ChIP-seq and pharmacological interventions). Hence practical familiarity and experience with some genomic techniques and bioinformatic tools is required (ideally demonstrated through publications).

Our expectations:
The successful candidate will be a highly motivated scientist, interested in interdisciplinary work in the framework of the NC3 network. They will have a doctoral degree (or a comparable qualification) in biology, preferentially with a focus on evolution, behavioural ecology, sociobiology, genomics, epigenetics or another related field. They will also have a background, and ideally some postdoctoral experience, in at least two of the following areas: working with live insects, molecular lab skills, genomics/transcriptomics and bioinformatics. They will have excellent communication skills and be able to work both independently and as part of a multidisciplinary team. The working language of the Institute and the lab is English, and good proficiency in spoken and written English is a requirement. German language skills are not a requirement, but a willingness to learn is desirable.

Advantages for you:
The Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity provides a stimulating research environment with a number of scientific groups researching diverse topics centred on different aspects of evolution. As a part of the Collaborative Research Centre SFB/TRR 212 the project will involve intensive collaboration with consortium partners at the Universities of Münster and Bielefeld. The University of Münster is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to increasing the proportion of women academics. Consequently, we actively encourage applications by women. Female candidates with equivalent qualifications and academic achievements will be preferentially considered within the framework of the legal possibilities. The University of Münster is committed to employing more staff with disabilities. Candidates with recognised severe disabilities who have equivalent qualifications are given preference in hiring decisions, although some restrictions related to the access to field sites may apply. Positions can generally be filled as part-time positions if there are no compelling work-related reasons against doing so.

Are you interested?
Then we look forward to receiving your application, written in English, in one single PDF file, by 6 January 2022. Applications should be sent to Prof Jürgen Gadau at: gadauj@uni-muenster.de. Please note that we cannot consider other file formats. Applications should include 1) a cover letter with a statement of research interests and motivation (max. 1 page), 2) a CV including details about research experience and publications, and 3) contact details for at least two referees.

45,000 students and 8,000 employees in teaching, research and administration, all working together to shape perspectives for the future – that is the University of Münster (WWU). Embedded in the vibrant atmosphere of Münster with its high standard of living, the University's diverse research profile and attractive study programmes draw students and researchers throughout Germany and from around the world.

Posted 17/12/2021


PhD: Imprinting and Ploidy in Bumblebees, Leicester

Deadline for applications: 7 January 2022

Project highlights

Overview
This project asks how can imprinted genes exist in a haplodiploid organism. Genomic imprinting is when the expression of an allele is dependent on the parent it came from, Genomic imprinting is an important area of research in plant breeding and in evolutionary biology and has relevance to some human cancers and developmental syndromes.
Recently, as part of a current NERC funded research grant and a CENTA 1 PhD, we have discovered imprinted genes in bumblebees (see Figure 1). This is a major finding and opens the door to multiple other questions. Bumblebees are haplodiploid, that is fertilised eggs (diploids) become females. Unfertilised eggs (haploids) become males. This leads to a paradox,  genomic imprinting restricts expression of certain genes to one parental allele. As a consequence, both maternal and paternal chromosomes are required for successful development. How can males function, given that we would predict a number of genes to be imprinted and therefore non-functional.
A corollary of this, through a quirk of inbreeding in bumblebees, diploid males are easy to produce. How do these animals function give that they presumably have doubled the number of alleles compared to their haploid brothers? Previous work suggests that they have similar expression levels to haploid males, but what about the imprinted genes in these diploids.
A final area of interest is imprinting at different stages. Our data shows imprinting in the adult bee. When does this arise? Are different genes imprinted at different stages?

Methodology
The student will produce haploid males from ten normal colonies. Diploid males will come from ten inbred colonies. RNA from these will be extracted. Imprinted gene expression will be analysed using candidate gene RNA-seq analysis.
Imprinted genes showing interesting patterns (differences between females, haploid and diploid males) will have their gene expression altered using RNAi to examine the resultant phenotype.
The reciprocal cross used in the initial work (NERC funded) will be repeated and this time samples will be taken at larval and pupal stages. They will be analysed using RNA-seq and GLMs to identify stage specific imprinted genes.
Training and skills
The student will be provided with training, as required, in R, a powerful and increasing popular statistical programming language, Python, a general-purpose, high-level programming language widely used in bioinformatics, molecular biology and bee husbandry.
Training will also be provided in the preparation of both transcriptomic NGS libraries. The student will also become conversant with general molecular biology techniques such as PCR, qPCR and cloning.
Partners and collaboration

This is a collaborative project between the lead supervisor Mallon and co-supervisor Rosato.  The supervisors have complimentary interests and expertise in gene expression and social insects and of next generation sequencing techniques to investigating these areas. Mallon will provide specific expertise in the role of epigenetics and gene expression, while Rosato provides expertise in candidate gene molecular biology. This proposal will benefit greatly from the ongoing collaboration between M and R in co-supervising a current PhD student working on bumblebees.

Further details
Please contact Eamonn Mallon, Department of genetics and genome biology, University of Leicester, ebm3@le.ac.uk for further details. https://www2.le.ac.uk/projects/selab

To apply to this project please visit: https://le.ac.uk/study/research-degrees/funded-opportunities/centa-phd-studentships
 
Possible timeline
Year 1: Haploid males. Bee husbandry. Collecting samples. Carrying out treatments. Production and sequencing of libraries. Begin analysis.
Year 2: Diploid males. Bee husbandry. Collecting samples. Carrying out treatments. Production and sequencing of libraries. Begin analysis.
Year 3: Reciporcal crosses, RNA-seq and RNAi.

Further reading

Posted 4/1/2022


Postdoc: Ant Population Genomics, Social Supergene Evolution, University of Lausanne

Application deadline: 15 January 2022 (Incoming applications will continue to be considered until the position is filled)

A Postdoctoral position is available in the group of Prof. Michel Chapuisat at the Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. The group studies social evolution. We are currently investigating the origin, evolution, and mechanisms of action of a supergene controlling social organization across Formica ants (see http://www.unil.ch/dee/page7000.html). Recent research showed that some species have three supergene haplotypes. F. selysi and F. cinerea commonly hybridize, raising the possibility of supergene introgression. The postdoctoral researcher will generate and analyse population genomics data to uncover key processes governing supergene evolution, including selection, genetic load, drive and introgression. This project will shed light on how supergenes arise, spread and shape complex alternative phenotypes.

Your responsibilities:
You will study the evolution of a social supergene. This will involve field sampling of multiple ant species, population analyses (e.g. sex-ratio, male production), sequencing, population genomic and comparative genomic analyses. Depending on your personal interests and skills, projects on genome evolution, molecular evolution, behavioural genetics and ecological genomics are also possible.

Your qualifications:
We are seeking to recruit an early carrier post-doctoral researcher with a PhD degree in evolutionary biology, genetics, genomics, bioinformatics or related fields. The ideal candidate should have skills and experience in one or more of the following fields: population biology, population genetics, comparative genomics, ecological genomics, molecular evolution. The candidate should have a convincing publication track-record, excellent inter-personal skills and a strong ability to work in a team.

Job information:
Expected start date in position: 01.03.2022 (or at earliest convenience)
Contract length: 1 year, renewable depending on funding available
Activity rate: 100%
Workplace: Lausanne - Dorigny

What the position offers you:
We offer a nice working place in a multicultural, diverse and dynamic academic environment, with opportunities for professional training. The Department of Ecology and Evolution in Lausanne University hosts research groups working on a broad range of topics, producing a rich intellectual and social life. The working language in the group and in the Department is English for all scientific matters. Good command of English is needed, some knowledge of French would be a plus, but is not mandatory. The University of Lausanne offers state-of-the-art facilities, including excellent computer facilities and molecular labs.

Contact for further information:
Prof. Michel Chapuisat: Michel.Chapuisat@unil.ch

Your application:
Deadline: 15.01.2022.
Incoming applications will continue to be considered until the position is filled.
To apply, please upload a single pdf document containing: a cover letter with a short description of your research interests, research experience, and why you are interested in joining our group; Your CV; The contact details of 2-3 referees; A copy of your PhD degree. Ideally, you should have received your PhD within the last 2 years or be about to obtain it in the next four months.

To receive full consideration, application documents should be uploaded online through the University of Lausanne recruitment platform.
Please apply through this webpage: https://bit.ly/3pDXMs1

Posted 17/12/2021


2 PhD Positions, Ant Population Genomics & Social Supergene Drive, University of Lausanne

Application deadlines: 15 January 2022 and 1 February 2022 (Incoming applications will continue to be considered until the positions are filled)

Two Ph.D. positions (graduate assistants) in evolutionary biology are available in the group of Prof. Michel Chapuisat at the Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. The successful candidates will join a group studying the evolution and genomic basis of social organization in ants (see http://www.unil.ch/dee/page7000.html).

1) THE EVOLUTION OF SUPERCOLONIALITY

The objective of the Ph.D. will be to investigate the evolution of supercoloniality in ants of the genus Formica. In the Swiss Jura mountains, the native wood ant Formica paralugubris forms large supercolonies, with hundreds of nests connected by trails and hundreds of queens in each nest. The evolution of such supercolonies is still poorly understood. High-throughput sequencing and population genomic analyses will provide high-resolution information on population structure, dispersal patterns, symbionts, and genomic basis of colony traits such as sex ratio. Comparative analyses will reveal if the supergene controlling polymorphic social organization in other Formica species has been fixed or lost in F. paralugubris, and if the same genes and alleles are associated with high colony queen number across the genus.

Your responsibilities:
You will develop research on the evolution of ant sociality and supercoloniality. This will involve field sampling, sequencing, population genomic and comparative genomic analyses. Depending on your interests and skills, behavioural and ecological experiments are also possible.

Your qualifications:
In order to complete our team, we are looking for someone with a Master's degree in biology, life sciences, genetics, bioinformatics, or related subjects. Applicants should have knowledge and skills pertaining to evolutionary biology, population genetics, molecular evolution and/or behavioural ecology. We are looking for a creative and driven person with excellent interpersonal skills.

Job information:
Expected start date in position: 01.03.2022 (or at earliest convenience)
Contract length: The initial contract is for 1 year, renewable twice for two years, up to a maximum of 5 years in total
Activity rate: 85%
Workplace: Lausanne - Dorigny

What the position offers you:
We offer a nice working place in a multicultural, diverse and dynamic academic environment, with opportunities for professional training. The Department of Ecology and Evolution in Lausanne University hosts research groups working on a broad range of topics, producing a rich intellectual and social life. The working language in the group and in the Department is English for all scientific matters. Good command of English is needed, some knowledge of French would be a plus, but is not mandatory. The University of Lausanne offers state-of-the-art facilities, including excellent computer facilities and molecular labs.

Contact for further information:
Prof. Michel Chapuisat : Michel.Chapuisat@unil.ch

Your application:
Deadline: 15.01.2022
Incoming applications will continue to be considered until the position is filled.

To apply, please upload a single pdf document containing: a cover letter with a short description of your research interests, research experience, and why you are interested in joining our group; Your CV; The contact details of 2-3 referees; A copy of your Master degree; Your Master’s thesis summary.

To receive full consideration, application documents should be uploaded online through the University of Lausanne recruitment platform.
Please apply through this webpage: https://bit.ly/3rRa0Ak

2) SELFISH SUPERGENE IN ANTS

The objective of the Ph.D. will be to investigate the mechanisms by which a social supergene distorts Mendelian transmission. In the Alpine silver ant, Formica selysi, a large supergene controls colony social organization, and the haplotype associated with multiple-queen colonies selfishly distorts transmission by killing progeny that did not inherit this haplotype. In collaboration with the team, you will identify the selfish genetic element and characterize the process causing brood developmental arrest. The research will provide insights into the role of selfish genetic elements in the evolution of supergenes controlling complex phenotypes.

Your responsibilities:
You will develop research on selfish genetic elements (toxin-antidote elements) present in supergenes. This will involve field sampling, breeding experiments, molecular analyses (transcriptomics, proteomics, RNAi), developmental studies, and genome analyses.

Your qualifications:
In order to complete our team, we are looking for someone with a Master's degree in biology, life sciences, genetics, or related subjects. Applicants should have knowledge and skills pertaining to evolutionary biology, genetics, development, or behavioural ecology. We are looking for a creative and driven person with excellent interpersonal skills.

Job information:
Expected start date in position: 01.04.2022 (or at earliest convenience)
Contract length: The initial contract is for 1 year, renewable twice for two years, up to a maximum of 5 years in total
Activity rate: 85%
Workplace: Lausanne - Dorigny

What the position offers you:
We offer a nice working place in a multicultural, diverse and dynamic academic environment, with opportunities for professional training. The Department of Ecology and Evolution in Lausanne University hosts research groups working on a broad range of topics, producing a rich intellectual and social life. The working language in the group and in the Department is English for all scientific matters. Good command of English is needed, some knowledge of French would be a plus, but is not mandatory. The University of Lausanne offers state-of-the-art facilities, including excellent computer facilities and molecular labs.

Contact for further information:
Prof. Michel Chapuisat : Michel.Chapuisat@unil.ch

Your application:
Deadline: 01.02.2022
Incoming applications will continue to be considered until the position is filled.

To apply, please upload a single pdf document containing: a cover letter with a short description of your research interests, research experience, and why you are interested in joining our group; Your CV; The contact details of 2-3 referees; A copy of your Master degree; Your Master’s thesis summary.

To receive full consideration, application documents should be uploaded online through the University of Lausanne recruitment platform.
Please apply through this webpage: https://bit.ly/3oDPO2T

Posted 17/12/2021


PhD position: Bee social behavior and life history evolution, Utah State University

Open until filled, but deadline of 15 December 2021 to be included in recruiting events

The Kapheim Lab (https://www.kapheimlab.com/) at Utah State University is recruiting a PhD student to study the relationship between life history evolution and social behavior in bees starting Fall 2022. The project will focus on the facultatively eusocial bee, Megalopta genalis, with a combination of behavioral field work, physiological assays, and analyses of gene expression. Field work will be conducted at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama (https://stri.si.edu/). Potential students interested in social evolution and with a desire to develop skills in behavioral ecology, physiology, and bioinformatics are encouraged to apply.

The position comes with a competitive support package including research and travel funding, salary, tuition waivers, and health insurance. The position will be open until filled, but applications should be completed by Dec. 15 to be included in the Department of Biology Recruiting events (https://biology.usu.edu/education/graduate-program/application_guideline).

The Kapheim Lab is a collaborative group of scientists who are committed to cultivating equity, diversity, and inclusion in academia while promoting professional, scientific, and personal growth for every member of our team. More information, including our Code of Conduct and mentoring policies can be found on the lab website. Potential applicants should please send an email to Dr. Kapheim (karen.kapheim@usu.edu) with a CV and brief statement of interest that describes why you are interested in the research and graduate school more generally. Please also feel free to email with any questions.

Karen M. Kapheim
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
Utah State University
5305 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322
karen.kapheim@usu.edu
https://www.kapheimlab.com/

Posted 7/12/2021


2 postdoc positions: Behavioural Genomics and Molecular Ecology, York University, Canada

Deadline for applications: 17 December 2021

The Rehan Lab (www.rehanlab.com) is hiring 2 postdoc positions to study 1) behavioural genomics of maternal care and 2) molecular ecology using museomics. The Rehan lab is a collaborative group of researchers, staff, and students focusing on bee behaviour, ecology and evolution. The candidates will join a vibrant team of integrative biologists passionate about social evolution and wildlife conservation. 

Behavioural Genomics Position
This postdoc will examine existing data on time course transcriptomics to determine the effects of maternal care on offspring developmental plasticity. The candidate will have the opportunity to develop additional research projects on molecular evolution and behavioural genomics. The successful candidate will have a strong background in comparative genomics and bioinformatics. Analytical and writing skills as well as familiarity with transcriptomic and network analyses are highly desirable.

Molecular Ecology Position 
The bee holobiome incorporates species’ population genomics, microbiomes and environmental DNA. This postdoctoral researcher will examine wild bee DNA to document species ranges, isolation by environment and ecological stressors. This postdoc will examine wild bee symbioses and potential pathogens in their environments using combined landscape ecology and museomics approaches. The candidate should have experience with bioinformatics and analysis of genomic data. Experience with bees, microbiome, and/or population genetics would be an asset.

York University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages applications from women and underrepresented groups. If interested, please send a CV, names of three references, and a short statement of interests to Sandra Rehan sanrehan@yorku.ca by Dec. 17, 2021. The Postdoctoral positions are available for two years (with flexible start dates able to start as soon as January 2021) and renewable up to three years with successful progress and performance.

Posted 7/12/2021


PhD opportunities: Institute of Science and Technology Austria

Deadline for applications: 8 January 2022

The Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) is looking for highly qualified candidates to apply for our PhD program. We offer fully-funded PhD positions in the natural and mathematical sciences in a world-class research environment on the outskirts of Vienna. The research groups that might interest evolutionary biologists include:

Nick Barton: Evolutionary theory/Analysis of a snapdragon hybrid zone
Sylvia Cremer: Social immunity
Calin Guet: Systems and synthetic biology of genetic networks
Max Jösch: Neuroethology
Fyodor Kondrashov: Evolutionary genomics
Matthew Robinson Medical & statistical genomics
Lora Sweeney Evolution and development of motor circuits
Gasper Tkacik: Information processing in biological systems
Beatriz Vicoso: Sex chromosome evolution
Daniel Zilberman: Epigenetics and chromatin

Our PhD program is characterized by innovative training with a special focus on interdisciplinarity, close mentoring by outstanding faculty within small research groups, and access to first-rate facilities. Students spend the first year completing coursework and rotations before choosing a group and passing the qualifying exam. Our PhD graduates have gone on to top positions in academia and industry all over the world.

Students with a bachelor's or master's degree in a relevant field are encouraged to apply. We offer internationally competitive salaries, full health benefits, and subsidized on-campus housing in the first year.

For more information about the PhD program and application process, as well as faculty profiles, please visit our website at: https://phd.pages.ist.ac.at

The deadline for PhD applications is January 8th 2022 for a start date in September 2022.

Nick Barton
Institute of Science and Technology Austria
nick.barton@ist.ac.at

Posted 7/12/2021


PhD: Role of gene regulation in the social control of queen behavioral specialization in ants, Mainz

Registration deadline: 20 January 2022
Application deadline: 27 January 2022

The Libbrecht group at the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Germany) is offering a 3-year PhD position (DFG, fully funded with possibility of extension, 65% TVL E13) to study the role of gene regulation in the social control of queen behavioral specialization in ants. The PhD student will be supervised by Romain Libbrecht (JGU Mainz) in collaboration with Joe Colgan (JGU Mainz), René Ketting (IMB Mainz) and Franjo Weissing (University of Groningen), and will be integrated in the GenEvo research training program (https://www.genevo-rtg.de).

Division of labor between specialized castes is central to the functioning and evolution of insect societies.

Queens monopolize reproduction, while workers perform all the tasks necessary to maintain the colony. Queens are typically seen as egg production units, to the point where their function in insect societies has been compared to that of the germline in multicellular organisms. Some of our recent work has challenged this longstanding view by revealing unexpected flexibility in queens of the black garden ant Lasius niger. We have shown that the presence of workers inhibits brood care behavior in founding queens. Moreover, we found that removing workers from established colonies caused old queens to revert to expressing brood care. These results indicate that the presence of workers not only initiates, but also maintains the behavioral specialization of queens that can live up to 30 years. As a means to understand the molecular basis of queen behavioral specialization, we have also performed brain RNAseq to identify genes that differ in expression between queens with and without workers. In this project, we will ask the question: What are the gene regulatory mechanisms that regulate the gene expression changes underlying the social control of queen brood care behavior? The project will include empirical and theoretical components. The empirical investigations will involve the collection and experimental manipulations of ant colonies, extensive behavioral analyses, RNAi knockdown of candidate genes, molecular biology techniques, sequencing technologies (e.g., RNAseq, WGBS, ChIPseq) and associated bioinformatics analyses. The theoretical aspects will be developed in collaboration with Franjo Weissing, including via a research stay in his group at the University of Groningen.

We are looking for a highly motivated student with a Master degree (or equivalent) in biology, good English skills, and a keen interest in evolutionary biology. Previous experience with social insects, molecular biology, statistics and bioinformatics is advantageous, but not required. The successful applicant will join an international, interactive, dynamic and English-speaking scientific environment in a brand new building with access to state-of-the-art, newly equipped laboratories and climate-controlled rooms. The JGU of Mainz hosts many excellent scientific institutions, and Mainz is a historic city located on the Rhine River with a large student population and a rich social and cultural life.

Interested candidates should register to the IPP (https://ipp2.imb.de/registration) before 20 January 2022 and complete their application before 27 January 2022. Informal enquiries should be sent to Dr. Romain Libbrecht (romain.libbrecht@uni-mainz.de).

The starting date for the position is 1 July 2022. The Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz is interested in increasing the number of women in science. Applications from women are therefore strongly encouraged. In addition, qualified candidates with disabilities will be preferred.

Dr. Romain Libbrecht
Assistant Professor / Junior Group Leader
Institute of Organismic and Molecular Evolution
Johannes Gutenberg University
Mainz, Germany
+49 6131 3927852

Posted 7/12/2021


Join the PhD Programme „Gene Regulation in Evolution“ (GenEvo) in Mainz, Germany

Deadline: 20 January 2022

Thinking of doing your PhD in the Life Sciences? The PhD Programme „Gene Regulation in Evolution“ (GenEvo) in Mainz, Germany is offering 14 talented, young scientists the chance to work on cutting edge research projects! Check out our poster at https://www.genevo-rtg.de/fileadmin/_processed_/c/6/csm_IMB_Genevo_Poster_2021_V2_3c3e73470a.jpg !

In the vivid network of the programme, scientist are researching together on the core question of how complex and multi-layered gene regulatory systems have evolved. Experts in their field support & train our PhD students in their cross-over research as well as their personal development. Our working language is English. Within the programme the Faculty of Biology of Mainz University (JGU) and the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) collaborate — both modern research institutions located on the bustling campus of Mainz University in Germany.

Find more information on our programme, offered projects and the application process on our webpage: https://www.genevo-rtg.de/

The registration deadline is 20 January 2022. Interviews will take place 04-06 April 2022. Starting date: 1 July 2022

We are looking forward to your application!

Best regards,
Sonja Wendenburg
E-Mail: GenEvo@uni-mainz.de

NB. The program is Coordinated by Susanne Foitzik, and there are many opportunities for social insect research at Mainz

Posted 7/12/2021


Postdoc: Evolution of mimetic colour patterns in bumblebees, Pennsylvania State University

Application Review started 1 November 2021 but position will remain open until filled

The Hines Lab at The Pennsylvania State University (Biology Department, University Park, PA, USA; hineslab.org) is hiring a Postdoctoral Scholar to perform research on an NSF-funded project examining the genetic basis of mimetic color diversity in bees. The postdoc will lead a project examining how transcriptomes shift with the repeated acquisition of mimetic color variants spanning a clade of North American bumble bees. The exceptional diversity and convergence in this system provides an opportunity to examine the different genetic routes to an adaptive phenotype and to connect micro- to macroevolutionary processes through examining patterns of inheritance of adaptive alleles across lineages.

The project involves field collection of bumble bee queens in the western United States, rearing of colonies, developmental staging and dissections, transcriptome sequencing, and comparative analysis of transcriptome variation across several bumble bee morphs and species. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in a biology-related field, have a strong record of research involving both molecular and bioinformatic techniques, and an interest in evolutionary genetics/evo-devo. Experience in working with insects is desired, but not necessary.

This experience provides numerous opportunities for training as PSU has a strong focus on Bioinformatics and Genomics, houses several project-relevant facilities in the PSU Huck Institute of Life Sciences (e.g., microscopy, genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics), is home to the Center of Pollinator Research and the Insect Biodiversity Center, and offers numerous cross-departmental seminars and programs. The postdoc will also engage the labs of Jeff Lozier (U. Alabama) and Jonathan Koch (USDA ARS, Utah) in this research.

The Pennsylvania State University requires all applicants to register and complete the application form at the Penn State employment website (https://psu.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/PSU_Academic/job/University-Park-Campus/Postdoctoral-Scholar---Hines-lab_REQ_0000021143-1). A complete application will include a cover letter detailing relevant experience and research interests, a current CV, and contact information for three professional references. As per Penn State policy, this is a limited-term appointment funded for one year from date of hire with excellent possibility of re-funding with intention of 3 years of funding. Anticipated start date is between January 2022 and Summer 2022. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact Heather Hines (hmh19@psu.edu) for more information.

The Pennsylvania State University is committed to and accountable for advancing diversity, equity, inclusion, and sustainability in all of its forms. We embrace individual uniqueness, foster a culture of inclusion that supports both broad and specific diversity initiatives, leverage the educational and institutional benefits of diversity in society and nature, and engage all individuals to help them thrive. We value inclusion as a core strength and an essential element of our public service mission.

Posted 7/12/2021


Post-doc: Honey Bee Genomics and Molecular Neuroscience, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Application Review started 8 November 2021 but position will remain open until filled

The Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) seeks a Postdoctoral Research Associate as part of a project using honey bees, genomics, comparative genomics, and molecular neuroscience to advance our understanding of the mechanisms and evolution of eusociality. Research approaches will include apiculture, lab and field work, behavior, genomics, molecular biology, and statistical analyses.

The project is based in the laboratory of Professor Gene Robinson at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A successful candidate will be able to work independently, as well as collaboratively within the Robinson laboratory and the Gene Networks in Neural & Developmental Plasticity Research Theme in the IGB.

Required Qualifications:
• A Ph.D. or the equivalent in entomology, evolutionary biology, genetics, genomics, neuroscience, or related field
• Experience with lab and field work, particularly with honey bee biology and animal behavior
• Strong English writing and oral communication skills
• Strong organizational skills
• Ability to work in a collaborative environment

Strong candidates will also possess the following attributes:
• A proven record of publishing research
• Experience with genomics and bioinformatics
• Strong statistical skills
• Creativity, independence, and the desire to learn

Application Instructions:
Interested candidates should email a single pdf file with “Honey Bee Genomics application” in the subject line containing 1) a statement of research experience, interests and career goals, 2) curriculum vitae including complete publication list, and 3) names, e-mail addresses and telephone numbers for three references to: Gene Robinson, generobi@illinois.edu. Review of applications began November 8, 2021, but applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Full application details are at: https://www.igb.illinois.edu/sites/default/files/uploads/Postdoctoral%20Research%20Associate_Robinson_HoneyBeeGenomics_2021_Final.pdf

Posted 13/11/2021


PhD: Floral preferences of bumblebees across a range of European climates, Durham

Deadline: 7th January 2022

To apply:https://www.iapetus2.ac.uk/how-to-apply/

Background.
Bumblebees are agriculturally important pollinators, but are currently declining in abundance in the UK and around the world, in part due to climate change (Soroye et al. 2020). Understanding these declines requires research on the biology and ecology of these species. Bumblebees are thought to be generalists, pollinating a variety of flower species. However, our preliminary observations conducted in Durham in summers 2020 and 2021 indicate that different bumblebee species prefer different plants (see also Sikora et al. 2020). Bumblebees have been a preferred insect model for neuroethology and sensory neuroscience, and a wealth of earlier work has focussed on the importance of visual cues and nectar/pollen reward for foraging honeybees and bumblebees (Latty and Trueblood 2020). In contrast, the importance of floral smells is less well known, although some works report the essential role of flower volatiles in bumblebees’ floral choice (Galen and Kevan 1983; Suchet et al. 2011; Haber et al. 2019). This project will investigate olfactory preferences of commonly occurring bumblebees (e.g. Bombus terrestris, Bombus pascuorum and Bombus lapidarius) to naturally-occurring floral volatiles, and how these preferences are affected by climatic conditions and background plant communities in Norway (Kløfta), UK (Durham and Stirling), Germany (Würzburg), Italy (Milan) and Portugal (Braganca). We expect the plants that the bumblebees forage on to differ between these location, due to different climatic condition. We hypothesise that, despite the differences in plant species, the key components of floral bouquets will be very similar across test locations.

Aims.
1) To identify plants that bumblebees forage on in the five countries, to establish plant preferences for bumblebee species;
2) Collect floral volatiles from the plants identified in Aim 1, as well as florals that bumblebees do not forage on, as controls; analyse these volatiles by GC/MS;
3) Establish behavioural preferences of bumblebees in response to full floral bouquets and components of bouquets, fractions and synthetic components of that are specific for focal plant species.

Methodology:
Bee and plant collections will be conducted in the areas around Durham, Stirling, Kløfta, Würzburg, Milan and Braganca in March-September during the local bumblebee foraging periods. The student will be advised and assisted during field collection by OR and local members of the supervisory team. Student will be trained to identify plants and bumblebees via morphological cues and DNA barcoding. Floral volatiles will be collected at the same time as bumblebees by using standard volatiles traps, and will be analysed by the student via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in TS laboratory. Behavioural olfactory assays on bees will be conducted in the field or either in the glasshouse at the Biocentre, University of Würzburg or in a glasshouse at Durham Botanical garden. The bees will be given a choice between 2 stimuli, or stimulus and a control, and their preference for a smell will be inferred from the tendency of a bee to land at the stimulus.

Training and skills:

The student will receive training:
1) by supervisors with complementary skills and expertise;
2) by collaborators and postdocs in the seven participating institutions;
3) by attending summer courses, conferences and Durham-run training events;
4) by participating in regular public outreach activities;
5) by helping OR to supervise UG students;
6) by presenting their work at lab meetings and conferences.

The student will acquire knowledge and skills in:
1) insect chemical ecology and neuroethology;
2) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and collection of volatiles;
3) bumblebee rearing;
4) identification of bumblebees and plants;
5) molecular biology methods;
6) cutting-edge techniques for behavioural analysis;
7) presentation and scientific writing;
8) research supervision;
9) Impact and public outreach.

Requirements:
We are looking for an independent and enthusiastic student able to develop the project and drive it forward. Interest in sensory ecology, neuroethology, animal behaviour, chemical ecology and previous research experience are a plus.
You should be available to conduct field and lab work in the UK and in continental Europe. The peak time for field work is in March – September.

Further information:
Informal enquiries are strongly encouraged and should be directed to Dr Lena Riabinina, olena.riabinina@durham.ac.uk, +44-191-334-1282

Funding Notes
This project is in competition with others for funding. Students of any nationality may receive full funding. Success will depend on the quality of applications received, relative to those for competing projects. If you are interested in applying, in the first instance contact the supervisor, with a CV and covering letter, detailing your reasons for applying for the project.

References
Galen C, Kevan PG (1983) Bumblebee foraging and floral scent dimorphism: Bombus kirbyellus Curtis ( Hymenoptera: Apidae) and Polemonium viscosum Nutt. ( Polemoniaceae). Can J Zool 61:1207–1213. https://doi.org/10.1139/z83-164
Haber AI, Sims JW, Mescher MC, et al (2019) A key floral scent component (β-trans-bergamotene) drives pollinator preferences independently of pollen rewards in seep monkeyflower. Funct Ecol 33:218–228. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.13246
Latty T, Trueblood JS (2020) How do insects choose flowers? A review of multi‐attribute flower choice and decoy effects in flower‐visiting insects. J Anim Ecol 89: 2750–2762. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13347
Raines K, Whitehorn P, Copplestone D, Tinsley M (2020) Chernobyl-level radiation exposure damages bumblebee reproduction: a laboratory experiment. Proc R Soc B 287: 20201638. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.1638
Sikora A, Michołap P, Sikora M (2020) What kind of flowering plants are attractive for bumblebees in urban green areas? Urban For Urban Green 48:126546. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ufug.2019.126546
Soroye P, Newbold T, Kerr J (2020) Climate change contributes to widespread declines among bumble bees across continents. Science 367:685–688. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aax8591
Suchet C, Dormont L, Schatz B, et al (2011) Floral scent variation in two Antirrhinum majus subspecies influences the choice of naïve bumblebees. Behav Ecol Sociobiol 65:1015–1027. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-010-1106-x

https://www.findaphd.com/phds/project/floral-preferences-of-bumblebees-across-a-range-of-european-climates/?p137456

Posted 15/11/2021


Graduate Positions: Comparative Evolutionary Genomics of Bumble Bees and their Color Patterns, Alabama

No application deadline given, but position starts autumn 2022 or earlier

Graduate positions are available in the laboratory of Jeff Lozier at The University of Alabama (lozierlab.ua.edu) as part of a recently awarded NSF project: "How many routes to the same phenotype? Genetic changes underlying parallel acquisition of mimetic color patterns across bumble bees". This project is a collaboration with Dr Heather Hines at Penn State (hineslab.org/) and Dr Jonathan Koch at the USDA Bee Lab in Logan, UT (jonathanbkoch.weebly.com).

Students will be involved in an interdisciplinary project to study the origins of color pattern variation in bumble bees. The project involves comparative population genomics using whole genome resequencing of many North American bumble bee species to examine processes like speciation and the genomic changes associated with phenotypic variability within and between species. Range-wide whole genome data is already available in the lab for many bumble bee species and students will be involved in additional field work and generation of sequencing data. Students will also be able to make use of these data sets to develop projects relating to genome assembly, conservation, landscape genomics, and evolution of North American bumble bees.

We are looking to recruit highly motivated students with interests in applying modern molecular and computational tools in a non-model group with ecological and economic importance. Students will join an active, diverse, collaborative, and friendly lab (lozierlab.ua.edu/people.html) and department (U Alabama Biological Sciences: bsc.ua.edu).

Contact Jeff Lozier (jlozier@ua.edu) for more information. The position is available starting Fall 2022, but students interested in starting earlier are also encouraged to contact Jeff.

Posted 13/11/2021

 


PhD project on Bee Behavior & Ecology, Bristol

Application deadline: 10 January 2022

We invite applications for a PhD project opportunity to work on social bee behaviour and ecology in Christoph Grueter’s group at the University of Bristol, UK.  

The project proposes to study how drifting behaviour is linked to foraging ecology and colony defence. This project involves field work in the UK, with honeybees, and in the Brazilian Amazon region, with stingless bees. The supervisor team includes Dr. Emily Bell (Bristol University) and is coordinated in collaboration with non-profit organisation Meli (www.meli-bees.org). Application deadline: 10 January 2022, start in September 2022. For more details, please see: https://t.co/moyUIm1Nye?amp=1. For information about requirements, see: https://t.co/GphhOtPZvQ?amp=1. Apply via: https://tinyurl.com/y7ttru8a

For informal enquiries, please contact Christoph Grueter: c.grueter@bristol.ac.uk 

Posted 4/11/2021


PhD: Ants as ecosystem engineers: using ants to promote biodiversity, University of York, UK

Application Deadline: Friday, January 14, 2022

Supervisors: Dr Elva Robinson, University of York, Dr Kelly Redeker, University of York, Carl Hawke, The National Trust.

We are looking for an enthusiastic student to develop a PhD project using field experiments to quantify the relationship between meadow ants and management regimes, and how these together affect biodiversity and soil function. The ideal candidate will enjoy interacting with both academics and stakeholders and will want to apply their scientific training to an important applied question.
More information about the project available at: https://www.findaphd.com/phds/project/acce-dtp-fully-funded-project-ants-as-ecosystem-engineers-using-ants-to-promote-biodiversity/?p136252.

Funding Notes:
This project is part of the ACCE NERC Doctoral Training Programme in Ecology and Evolution (https://acce.shef.ac.uk). Appointed candidates will be fully-funded for 3.5 years. The funding includes:
Tax-free annual UKRI stipend (£15,609 for 2020/21)
UK tuition fees (£4,500 for 2021/22)
Research support and training charges
International candidates (including EU) are eligible to apply, and there are a limited number of bursaries that will enable full studentships to be awarded to international applicants.

Posted 4/11/2021


Post-doc: Juvenile Hormone and the Evolution of Bee Eusociality, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

No specific deadline given (but early application advised)

Postdoc position: The cost of gonadotropic juvenile hormone to the brain and its possible influence on the evolution eusociality in bees

We are looking for an outstanding and highly motivated postdoc to lead a multidisciplinary project. This project aims to test a novel hypothesis that suggests answers to two old conundrums raised by the unique biology of advanced eusocial insects: First, social insect queens defy the widespread trade-off between reproduction and longevity. Second, Juvenile Hormone (JH), which is the ancient insect gonadotropin, does not appear to regulate fertility in highly eusocial honey bees and some eusocial ants. Our recent transcriptomic analyses (Shpigler et al. 2020) suggest that these two traits are linked because the ancestral gonadotropic function of JH comes with a previously unknown cost to the brain that is hard to sustain for extended periods. To rigorously test this hypothesis, the recruited postdoctoral fellow will use a multi-level approach integrating studies at the cellular and molecular levels, focusing on key anabolic and catabolic pathways, to organism level assays of memory, stress tolerance, and longevity in "primitively eusocial" bumble bees and advanced eusocial honeybees. We expect that this project will have significant contributions at two levels: animal physiology and the evolution of sociality. Support to our hypothesis implies that the evolution of extremely fertile and longed-lived females, a hallmark of advanced eusociality, requires modifications in ancestral JH signalling pathways.

Required qualifications:

We offer a strong, international and interdisciplinary working environment with an open academic atmosphere. Location is the beautiful city of Jerusalem. The university campus has already returned to normal teaching and research. The position can start immediately or later this summer. This project is supported by two grants with secured funding until the end of 2026.

For more details on our research, please see our website: http://guybloch.huji.ac.il/. For further information, please contact: Prof. Guy Bloch (guy.bloch@mail.huji.ac.il)

Posted 11/10/2021


PhD: Carpenter Ants and Their Endosymbionts, Texas Tech University

No specific deadline, but deadline for 2022 scholarships is early January 2022

The Manthey research group in the Department of Biological Sciences at Texas Tech University is recruiting a highly motivated individual for graduate studies (PhD) to work on questions related to the ecology and evolution of carpenter ants (Genus Camponotus) and their endosymbionts (Blochmannia) in North America.

Our group has collected whole-genome sequencing data from samples of several Camponotus species and their endosymbionts from hundreds of localities across North America to date (see: https://mantheylab.org/fieldwork/). We are looking for someone to join our research group to both work on the data sampled so far and expand the project in scope based on individual interests. Our current research themes with this study system include: (1) coevolution of ants and their symbionts, (2) landscape genomics of both ants and symbionts, and (3) genome evolution. Applicants with interests and/or experience in genomics and/or entomology are encouraged to apply.

The position is funded for 5 years (PhD applicants) through a combination of research and teaching assistantships in the Department of Biological Sciences at Texas Tech University.

Interested individuals should email a CV/resume to Dr. Joseph Manthey (jdmanthey@gmail.com or joseph.manthey@ttu.edu), as well as a statement of how your interests and the funded conservation genomics project complement each other. This statement will be used as a writing sample as well as an assessment of applicants' potential fit to the position.

The Department of Biological Sciences has a strong and dynamic group of scientists with a focus in ecology and evolutionary biology. The department has strengths in multiple areas of genomics, bioinformatics, and specialized disciplines of ecology and evolutionary biology. The departmental website can be found here: https://www.depts.ttu.edu/biology/

Deadline for applications:
Our department has year-long open admissions but has deadlines to be considered for scholarships and fellowships. For Fall 2022, this deadline is early January 2022. Please find all application details here: https://www.depts.ttu.edu/biology/academics/graduate/prospective-students/

All qualified applicants are encouraged to contact me and apply. While academic scores have a role in admissions, motivation and research experience are highly valued. Texas Tech University is an Equal Opportunity Employer, and we welcome applications from all qualified persons and will ensure that all applicants are treated fairly, equally, and respectfully.

Posted 11/10/2021


Post-doc: Genetic Conflict in Social Systems, Georgia Institute of Technology

Review of applications began 1 October 2021, but the position is open until filled.

The Goodisman Lab in the School of Biological Sciences at Georgia Tech seeks a postdoctoral fellow interested in studying questions focused on genetic conflict. The successful candidate would study the causes and consequences of genetic conflict on social behavior and evolution. This research program investigates the link between sociality and evolution using genetic approaches in social insect systems.

Candidates with experience in genetics, genomics, evolution, behavior, insect science, or computational biology may be appropriate. The candidate would be encouraged to develop an independent research direction that aligns with general research programs in the lab. The position is in the United States, but foreign nationals are eligible for the position and strongly encouraged to apply.

Interested applicants are encouraged to visit https://www.goodismanlab.biology.gatech.edu/ or contact Dr. Goodisman at mg225@gatech.edu for more information. Applicants should submit applications for Job ID 222494 through the site https://careers.hprod.onehcm.usg.edu/psc/careers/CAREERS/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId000&JobOpeningId"2494&PostingSeq=1

Applications should include: (1) A cover letter describing relevant experience, qualifications, and interests, (2) A curriculum vitae, and (3) The names and contact information of three references.

Review of applications will begin October 1, 2021 and continue until a suitable candidate is identified.

Posted 11/10/2021


Post-doc: Bumblebee Mimetic Color Variation, Penn State University

Review of applications begins 1 November 2021, but the position is open until filled.

The Hines Lab at The Pennsylvania State University (Biology Department, University Park, PA, USA; hineslab.org) is hiring a Postdoctoral Scholar to perform research on an NSF-funded project examining the genetic basis of mimetic color diversity in bumble bees. The postdoc will lead a project examining how transcriptomes shift with the repeated acquisition of mimetic color variants spanning a clade of North American bumble bees. The exceptional diversity and convergence in this system provides an opportunity to examine the different genetic routes to an adaptive phenotype and to connect micro- to macroevolutionary processes through examining patterns of inheritance of adaptive alleles across lineages.

The project involves field collection of bumble bee queens in the American West, rearing of bumble bee colonies, developmental staging and dissections, transcriptome sequencing, and comparative analysis of transcriptome variation across several bumble bee morphs and species. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in a biology-related field, have a strong record of research involving both molecular and bioinformatic techniques, and an interest in evolutionary genetics/evo-devo. Experience in working with insects is desired, but not necessary.

This experience provides numerous opportunities for training as PSU has a strong focus on Bioinformatics and Genomics, houses several project-relevant facilities in the PSU Huck Institute of Life Sciences (e.g., microscopy, genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics), is home to the Center of Pollinator Research and the Insect Biodiversity Center, and offers numerous cross-departmental seminars and programs. The postdoc will also engage the labs of Jeff Lozier (U. Alabama) and Jonathan Koch (USDA ARS, Utah) in this research.

The Pennsylvania State University requires all applicants to register and complete the application form at the Penn State employment website (https://hr.psu.edu/careers). A complete application will include a cover letter detailing relevant experience and research interests, a current CV, and contact information for three professional references. As per Penn State policy, this is a limited-term appointment funded for one year from date of hire with excellent possibility of re-funding with intention of 3 years of funding. Anticipated start date is between January 2022 (preferably) and Summer 2022. Review of applications will begin November 1 and continue until the position is filled. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact Heather Hines (hmh19@psu.edu) for more information.

The Pennsylvania State University is committed to and accountable for advancing diversity, equity, inclusion, and sustainability in all of its forms. We embrace individual uniqueness, foster a culture of inclusion that supports both broad and specific diversity initiatives, leverage the educational and institutional benefits of diversity in society and nature, and engage all individuals to help them thrive. We value inclusion as a core strength and an essential element of our public service mission.

Posted 15/10/2021


Post-doc: Bee Genomics, Penn State

Review of applications began 1 September 2021, but the position is open until filled.

Post-doctoral Scholar Research Associate in Genomics of Bees, University Park Campus.

Job Description and Position Requirements:
Penn State’s Department of Entomology and Insect Biodiversity Center is seeking a post-doctoral scholar research associate to study the transcriptional and epigenetic processes underlying complex phenotypes in bees. The candidate will join an interdisciplinary team of researchers examining how genetic variation, chromatin structure, and small RNAs interact to influence gene regulatory processes and gene networks underlying intragenomic conflict, caste differentiation, reproduction, social behavior, and/or adaptation to seasonal conditions. The primary model system will be honey bees (Apis mellifera) but the project can be expanded to include comparative studies with other bee species. The position will be housed in the laboratory of Christina Grozinger and include collaborations with faculty in the Department of Entomology, Department of Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Department of Physics.

Minimum qualifications:
• Ph.D. in molecular biology, genomics, entomology, animal behavior, or related field
• Experience in studying transcriptomics, gene regulatory processes, gene networks underlying complex phenotypes

Preferred qualifications:
• Experience in ChIP-seq or ATAC-seq analyses
• Familiarity with biology, behavior, and management of honey bees
• Demonstrated ability to work effectively both independently and with diverse teams of researchers
• Demonstrated ability to successfully and efficiently complete research projects and write peer-reviewed manuscripts.

Applicants are required to have a Ph.D. or equivalent doctorate in an appropriate field and be able to provide evidence that all requirements have been met for completion of the Ph.D. prior to the effective date of hire. This is a limited term appointment, funded for one one-year from date of hire, with excellent possibility of renewal.

Application Instructions:
Interested candidates should include a letter of interest, a resume, and contact information for 2-3 professional references. Review of applications will begin September 1, 2021, but applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Preferred start date: January 1, 2022. Questions about the position should be directed to Dr. Christina Grozinger, email cmg25@psu.edu.

For detailed instructions and to submit your application, please see: https://psu.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/PSU_Academic/job/University-Park-Campus/Post-doctoral-Scholar-Research-Associate-in-Genomics-of-Bees_REQ_0000016195-1

The Pennsylvania State University is committed to and accountable for advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in all of its forms. We embrace individual uniqueness, foster a culture of inclusive excellence that supports both broad and specific diversity initiatives, leverage the educational and institutional benefits of diversity, and engage all individuals to help them thrive. We value inclusive excellence as a core strength and an essential element of our public service mission.

Posted 11/10/2021

 

Vacancies will be advertised on this page until the closing date for applications, or, where no firm closing date is given, for a maximum of 3 months. If a position has been filled in the meantime, please let the webmaster know.

This site is maintained and promoted on the Internet by David Nash. email to: DRNash @ bio.ku.dk
Last modified Tuesday, January 4, 2022